Skip to main content

Home: MLA 8 Guide

Library's Homepage

Template for MLA 8

Instructions for Citing in MLA 8

Use this template for ALL Citations. If the item is absent, leave it out:
 

1. Author.

2. “Title of article, photo, video, or chapter.”

3. Title of the website, magazine, or book,

4. Other contributors,

5. Version numbers listed: ed. vol. or no.,

6. Publisher name,

7. Publication date,

8. Page numbers: p. or pp.

9. Title of database or other larger container,

10. Publisher of database or larger container,

11. URL (do not include http://) or DOI (for databases if available).

12. Accessed day month year.

Parenthetical Citations

Please introduce your quotes and paraphrased information with a signal phrase.

Works with author and page numbers:
(Popoff 10).

Works with an author and no page numbers:
(Parker).

Works without an author or page number:
("Stryper").

For more options, go to Purdue Owl's MLA website.

MLA 7 vs. MLA 8: What's Different?

- List the URL no matter what (that means the big long URL that databases provide - unless they provide a DOI, which you should include instead) but without the brackets or the http://

- The "Web" and "Print" identifiers are gone.  

- For websites, they got rid of the N.p., N.d. markers. 

- Corporate and Government entities and website nicknames (like Turtleboy) are now listed as "authors." 

- All websites should have an "Accessed" date (i.e. Accessed 28 Aug 2016.) at the end. 

- No longer list the publication city from print sources.  

- Articles from journals need to include volume, number, and page (vol. no. and p.)

Librarian

Jennifer Jourdain's picture
Jennifer Jourdain
Contact:
Montachusett Regional Vocational Technical School
1050 Westminster Street
Fitchburg, MA 01420
jourdain-jennifer@montytech.net
(978) 345-9200 x5125
Website / Blog Page

T.A.D.I.

When formatting your Works Cited, remember T.A.D.I.

T: Times New Roman, 12 point font (the entire page)
A: Alphabetical order
D: Double spaced throughout
I: Indent after the first line.

Sample Works Cited

   Works Cited

Eddy, Chuck. "Myth No. 2: Nirvana Killed Hair Metal." Spin, 10 Nov. 2009, www.spin.com/2009/11/myth-no-2-nirvana-killed-hair-metal. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Parker, James. "Bad Hair Days: A New Memoir by the Lead Singer of Ratt Recalls Perhaps the Most Forgettable Cultural Phenomenon of the Modern Era." The Atlantic, vol. 311, no. 4, May 2013, p. 36. General OneFile, Gale Group, libraries.state.ma.us/login?gwurl=http:// go.galegroup .com /ps/i.dod=GALE%7CA332021520&v=2.1&u= mlin_c_montytech &it=r&p=GPS&sw=w&asid=5b5d a2b36c2189edcee92b80a9153b4b. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Popoff, Martin. The Big Book of Hair Metal: The Illustrated Oral History of Heavy Metal's Debauched Decade. Quartro Publishing, 2014.

“The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years: 1988.” YouTube, uploaded by Huntervoi, 14 May 2007. www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9KCS8d82EM. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

 

MLA 8 Examples

Website Example:

Eddy, Chuck. "Myth No. 2: Nirvana Killed Hair Metal." Spin, 10 Nov. 2009, www.spin.com/2009/11/myth-no-2-nirvana-killed-hair-metal. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Database Example:

Parker, James. "Bad Hair Days: A New Memoir by the Lead Singer of Ratt Recalls Perhaps the Most Forgettable Cultural Phenomenon of the Modern Era." The Atlantic, vol. 311, no. 4, May 2013, p. 36. General OneFile, Gale Group, libraries.state.ma.us/login?gwurl=http://go.galegroup.com /ps/i.dod=GALE%7CA332021520&v=2.1&u= mlin_c_ montytech&it=r&p=GPS&sw=w&asid=5b5da2b36c2189edcee92b80a9153b4b. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Picture Found Online Example:

“Stryper Band Photo.” MetaMansion, metamansion.com/wp-content/uploads/images/Stryper_ 21305.jpg. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Print Book:

Popoff, Martin. The Big Book of Hair Metal: The Illustrated Oral History of Heavy Metal's Debauched Decade. Quartro Publishing, 2014.

Video Found Online Example:

“The Decline of Western Civilization Part II: The Metal Years: 1988.” YouTube, uploaded by Huntervoi, 14 May 2007.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=y9KCS8d82EM. Accessed 12 Aug. 2016.

Crafting Parenthetical Citations and Signal Phrases

  • Parenthetical Citations refer to the source where you found the information.  Everything that comes before the citation is assumed to have come from that source.
  • They match sources in the Works Cited (MLA).
  • They go after direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries.
  • They always go at the end of the sentence and the period goes after them.
  • These are also called "in-text" citations.
  • With a direct quote, the parenthetical citation goes between the end quote and the period.

Examples in MLA Style:

Paraphrase: Because children were usually baptised soon after birth, we celebrate Shakepeare's birthday as April 23, 1564 ("William Shakespeare").

Quotation: Shakespeare only mentions his wife once in his will, leaving her his "second best bed" ("William Shakespeare").

The parenthetical citations above relate to this citation from the Works Cited:

"William Shakespeare." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 30 Sep. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/high/article/109536. Accessed 27 Nov. 2016.


A "signal phrase" is used to introduce a quotation or paraphrased information. The following contains the signal phrase "According to." If the source material stated is from a database or the web and doesn't have page numbers, do not put anything in parenthesis afterwards.  If the source has page numbers, put the page number in parenthesis afterward the paraphrase.

Example:  According to Salisbury and Morris, the entertainment industry was created during the English Renaissance.

 

This is from the Works Cited:

Salisbury, Joyce and Lawrence Morris. "Theater in England: 15th and 16th Centuries." Daily Life through HistoryABC-CLIO, 2015. Web. 1 Mar. 2015.